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Friday, 27 October 2017

Who should, and why should they, think about installing Linux?

Definitely those who only use their home computer for writing letters, running spreadsheets, or browsing the Internet.

Then it is also extremely useful if you use the computer for music, including making your own ring tones, watching videos and editing photographs.

But don’t let this put you off if you do much more, Linux can do just about anything that Microsoft or Apple can, but it takes a bit of searching.

There is a link to somebody else’s article further down which, if you are interested in Linux, I suggest reading.

Before you even think about uninstalling your present computer operating system, there are things you should consider doing.

There is a great overall office program called LibreOffice. As this is also available for Microsoft or Apple computers, you can download it and get to know how it works before taking the drastic step of moving to Linus.

If you use Photoshop, then there is a Linux program called Gimp also available on Microsoft or Apple computers. Download it and play with it.

If you decide not to move to Linux, you can still use these programs and like 99% of Linux programs, they’re totally free of charge. I have about 60 major programs on my Linux desktop – and I am 78 years old.

This link will show you various Windows programs and their Linux counterparts, although very long, it is not the whole story. The link also shows you some applications which have Microsoft or Apple equivalent software which you can download before moving operating systems.

My suggestion is to keep with your Microsoft or Apple operating system for six months, run Firefox’s browser, get to know Thunderbird’s email program, run LibreOffice and get to know that. Maybe download the Gimp if you like Photoshop although there are a lot of more simple photo editing programs in Linux. Inkskape is a Coreldraw look alike which you may also want to run.

After six months, you can take the plunge, but the advantage is, you won’t have to learn all the application programs from new as you’d have been using them for months. You will never have to rely on or be dictated to, by Microsoft or Apple again.

Here is an article from someone who moved to Linux.

A little more about Operating Systems from this link:

About Linux, you will read:

“Because of its functionality, adaptability, and robustness, Linux is able to compete against the Unix and Microsoft operating systems. 

IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and other computer giants have embraced Linux and support its ongoing development. More than a decade after its initial release, Linux is being adopted worldwide mainly as a server platform. 

More and more people are starting to use Linux as a home and office desktop operating system. The operating system can also be incorporated directly into microchips in a process called “embedding.” Many appliances and devices are now starting to use operating systems in this way.”

To completely bewilder you, here’s a list of 23 operating systems! At the end of the Linux paragraph, it states: Linux is the most rapidly growing of any major operating system. Linux is the most rapidly growing of any major operating system.

However, Linux Mint has been acknowledged, by many, as the best “flavour” for absolute beginners. After six months to a year, you can experiment with some of the others. I started on Ubuntu but they seem to have neglected the desktop of their servers so I moved to Linux Mint where I have stayed.

Ampers.

1 comment:

Porgy Tirebiter said...

Maybe covered, and if so, I apologize.

-Get a Live CD or Memory Stick with Linux on board. You can boot off of this to 1) see if it will work with your hardware and 2) get some expeience.

-Live CD or Memory Stick can be used to install on hard drive, if desired, after evaluation.

-Install "dual boot" and leave Windows on your hardware. You choose which OS to use at boot screen. (Or install more than one version of Linux to try.)

-Another scenario: Your Windows hardware is useless due to a problem (virus, need to upgrade OS, hardware outdated and too expensive to replace, etc.) Install Linux, as it will work well with even older hardware.

-Really extreme: Computer is totally dead, but keyboard, monitor and mouse still work. Buy a Raspberry PI (<$50) and power adapter. (WiFi on board or will connect with Ethernet cable) Installed system is Linux and will provide a complete working system once again.