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I have been over zealous with political comment lately so have now accepted the offer to assemble and write for two blogs on the WatchingUK website. The "Good News" blog is for items where we have benefited from the Brexit referendum vote and the "Bad News" blog is where others have tried to damage our chances of leaving the EU.

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Saturday, 19 October 2013

Here are ten excellent tips to improve your writing.

Here are ten excellent tips to improve your writing. Because of copywrite, I only include five here, you will have to go to the authors website to read the last five. But it will be worth the trip.
As Mark Twain famously wrote, "I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead." His point? Strong writing is lean writing. 
When you want to make your writing more powerful, cut out words you don't need--such as the 10 included in this post: 
1. Just: The word "just" is a filler word that weakens your writing. Removing it rarely affects meaning, but rather, the deletion tightens a sentence. 
2. Really: Using the word "really" is an example of writing the way you talk. It's a verbal emphasis that doesn't translate perfectly into text. In conversation, people use the word frequently, but in written content it's unnecessary. Think about the difference between saying a rock is "hard" and "really hard," for example. What does the word add? Better to cut it out to make your message stronger. 
3. Very: Everything that applies to "really" applies to "very." It's a weak word. Cut it.
4. Perhaps/maybe: Do you want your audience to think you're uncertain about what you're saying? When you use words like "maybe" and "perhaps," uncertainty is exactly what you're communicating. 
5. Quite: When someone uses "quite," he or she either means "a bit" or "completely" or "almost." Sometimes the word adds meaning; sometimes it's fluff. Learn to tell the difference--but, when in doubt, cut it out.
To read the final five click on this link.

Ampers.

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