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Saturday, 30 April 2016

A strange song for a South African to push

But I like it!



Ampers

Friday, 29 April 2016

UKIP's amazing candidate for the Kent PCC

 UKIP are now attracting first class people into their ranks, One such person is standing as UKIP's Police and Crime Commissioner in Kent.

Here are a few details extracted from his CV.
Henry Bolton OBE is a former army intelligence officer [21 years], and then a former police officer [6 years]. He later became the "UK bi-lateral organised crime, strategic reform and special operations adviser".
He has also been described as "One Of The World's Leading Experts on Border Management Strategies."
He was also head of the International Police in Croatia and, after this, District Governor for the United Nations.
Another feather in his cap was when he was the Head of Border Management programmes for the world's largest security organisation, the "Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe," [not EU] and its 56 governments.
He was also the Crisis Management Adviser to the Albanian Prime Minister's Office.
And served as an officer for over two years in Helmand, Afghanistan.
Not only has he been awarded an OBE for services to International Security but also received a police award for outstanding bravery.
 You can find out more about Henry at his website.
On Facebook: Henry Bolton and on Twitter: HBolton4PCC
If he wins, you will see a ramp up in efficiency within the Kent Police.
Ampers.

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Why Ampers, an immigrant, wants to leave the EU.

Remain or leave

that is the question!

First of all, a little about me so you know where I am coming from.

I am an immigrant and left home at 15 and came to England. In those days, if you could afford the ticket, you were accepted!

I wasn't well disposed towards England as we still remembered the stories of the Boer War, handed down to each generation. After a year I went, and spent three years in the States, and when I came back, joined the British Army, spending three years in Paris with NATO and one year at the War Office. After that I settled down to life in England, perfected my English (third language) and worked as a salesman, then sales manager and started, built up, and sold several companies.

During this time I began to love the English as a race, but not their establishment which I blamed for the way 27,000 of our women and children were treated in the Boer War.

I was disillusioned with politics, I had joined the Young Conservatives and became a chairman there, but wanted something better. When UKIP came along I was one of its early members, and, for a year, was even their head office manager, when they were located in Regent Street.

Now I am a Patron of UKIP and pay a thousand a year for this privilege.

Why do I want to leave the EU?

Once a country loses it's sovereignty, it becomes subservient to the people who took it away. England's history goes back far longer than William the Conqueror (1066). England has been great, with their previous empire stretching three quarters of the world. I'm not debating what you did to get it, I'm simply saying you did it, and did it as a tiny little country which, until 1975, has always punched above its weight.

The ordinary “little” people around the EU are watching Brexit, and if we win, I know that at least five countries are thinking of following us. How rewarding, as a country, if we can help these people.

I have read comments by Patrick Minford, and many other economists and the general thinking on Brexit is, it will be a little rocky in the first year, then we will be marginally better off individually in the medium term, but will then surge ahead in the longer term to be more powerful financially than any country in Europe (and, of course, the EU).

Then there is the Euro. If you search on the EU's website you will learn that after 2020, all countries will have to adopt the EU so there is a universal currency.

The EU are now asking for an EU army, and once we assign our military to the EU we will not be able to defend ourselves and, if attacked will have to rely on the EU to come to our aid, which leads into my next paragraph.

Over the years we voted “no” to 70 resolutions and each time were ganged up upon with nobody or only one or two voting with us. When Germany sets out a resolution in council it is usually carried.

Looking at the above paragraph, it seems the “anglos” are well and truly hated. A similar theme to that awful European Song Contest – something else we should leave. Nil points!

And now we come to immigration. England's (Afrikaners refer to Britain, always as Engeland) race are the English. The race is not (and hasn't been for centuries) Anglo-Saxon. It has been diluted each century by immigrants and England has always welcomed genuine asylum seekers. But we can only let in those economic migrants who can contribute to our society and who can support themselves for four to five years. They must pay in taxes before they gain access to our NHS and benefits. By knowing how many we will let in each year, we can plan for the number of hospital beds, and staff we need to train; schools we need to build and teachers we need to train; GPs and surgeries we need to increase by. Not knowing how many will come from the EU makes this task impossible.

The United Nations term of Asylum Seeker is “they cease to be asylum seekers the moment they leave the first safe country they arrive at”.

Iceland, approx two thirds the size of Basildon, is doing extremely well outside of the EU. Britain is the fifth largest economy, except it has, since 2005, dropped from 5th to 12th, but only in terms of household income. Proof indeed that unfettered immigration hasn't been beneficial to our families.

Continuing the theme of immigration – I didn't want to dwell on it too long but this is important. There are over a million migrants in the EU (figure for 2015 is 1,321,560 claimed) and what I find frightening is, after they get their passports (mos of EU within 5 years (Austria is, I believe a little longer) they will be free to travel wherever they wish within the EU. And, remember, by then our minimum wage will be over £9. Then there are our high benefits. Remainians claim they only come here to work, but government figures show a different story.

There are more, less important reasons, but these are the main ones for now; I may add to them in the comments section at another time, you may add a comment today!

Finally: What is TTIP and six reasons why the answer should scare you.

Ampers.

Monday, 25 April 2016

Has Theresa May accepted a bribe from the EU

Listen carefully to this...


Now reflect that she also says we are safer in the EU and sides 100% with David Cameron on wanting desperately to remain in..

But then she says it's safer to stay in the EU.


She must be stark staring bonkers!

You are welcome to leave a comment below. Please try and refrain from using bad language! I know, it'll be hard!

Ampers.

Saturday, 16 April 2016

Donald Trump has united most of America, very humorous. And all about Remainians as well.

Although this video is called "I'm disappointed 'cos Donald Trump!" It is, in fact, not about Donald Trump. Stefan Molyneux does talk about Trump for the first few minutes of this 23 minute production but the rest of it is about people who bring emotional arguments to a rational discussion.

It is extremely humorous, and, at the end, you have a feeling that it has been well worth the time. In addition, you come away thinking how our government use dishonest emotional arguments to prove their case for us to remain.

Everyone who is fighting to leave this evil European Union must watch this, and learn how to devastate those using emotion to put their case.

Thank you Stefan.


Ampers

A few English people explain their hopes and fears in our referendum

First of all, I'd like to apologise to my regular readers who have signed up to receiving my blogs. I know I've claimed it is an eclectic blog, but do bear in mind that Britain is living in dangerous times.

The result of our referendum will decide whether "England" will disappear from world maps for ever, to be replaced by the names of eight regions. I talk about England because Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will get to keep their names - but not their independence.

I often wonder why the EU seniors hate England so much.

Anyway to this video where eight people give their reasons for wanting to leave the European Union.


Ampers.

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Hungarian PM puts Hungary on a war footing

If, after watching this speech, Remainians who still want to vote to remain in the EU must be treated as enemies to democracy and enemies of the UK.

I speak three languages but at 76, think I am too old to learn one of the two most difficult languages in Europe, otherwise I would immigrate to Budapest! I could live happily under Viktor Orbán.


Now we realise why Brussels desperately wants their own army?

Ampers.

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

The hidden joys of living in England.

Did I say joys? It's more of a ruddy nightmare. This Video is only twelve minutes long but I guarantee it will have you spitting blood at the end of it.


We really have to do something about this, especially those who pay council tax, or whose rent has been put up to pay part of your landlords council tax--if not all of his! In otherwords, everyone is affected by what this video contains.

Ampers.

Proof of unbelievable crookedness in American politics

This video was not made by either a Republican, or a Democrat, but by someone who is an Irish born Canadian blogger.

But it won't make happy reading if you are an honest US American.


Stefan Basil Molyneux is a Canadian blogger. Molyneux's areas of interest include anarcho-capitalism, secular ethics, libertarianism, cryptocurrencies, and familial relationships. Wikipedia

Born: September 24, 1966 (age 49), Athlone, Republic of Ireland

Spouse: Christina Papadopoulos

Influenced by: Ayn Rand, Murray Rothbard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Socrates, Sigmund Freud, Nathaniel Branden

Books:
Revolutions

Education:
University of Toronto, York University, McGill University

Enjoy the video, just under 20 minutes.

Ampers.

Saturday, 9 April 2016

Prime Ministers' gratuity payments after office

Ex Prime Ministers, such as Major, Blair, Brown, and soon Cameron, to name but a few, get an annual fee of £115,000 every year for the rest of their lives.

I have heard that this was originally brought in as we cannot have an impoverished Prime Minister. It would be a major embarrassment to the country.

However, times have moved on, and these people now cash in their fame and can earn up to £10,000 a pop as speaking fees alone.

I would like to see a change in the law which could be facilitated by the Inland Revenue.

By all means keep the amount as it is at present, but not as a payment. It should be used to top up a PMs income to £115,000, rather than get this money no matter what the MP earns. Investment income and pensions should also be taken into account.

When a PM submits his tax return, and it has been verified by the Inland Revenue; if the gross amount is under £115,000 the Inland Revenue sends a top up cheque to bring the amount up to this figure.

As, nowadays, with guest appearances, book sales, speaking engagements, investment income and pensions, most ex PMs earn well over this amount; it will ensure no cost to the tax payer, at least until they reach retirement age. Many, on retirement, will earn this amount just in investment income and previous pensions.

This will not save an enormous amount, but will bring the ruling back to its original requirement of not having an impoverished Prime Minister.

Ampers

Every Brexit fighter MUST watch this video

This is inspirational, and shows us a better way when talking to the undecideds.

Watch and enjoy.


Ampers

Thursday, 7 April 2016

Students, wondering what to study?

My tip is to wait until the 24th June and, if we elect to stay in the UK, I suggest you consider electrical engineering.

South Africa is crying out for electrical engineers, they have excellent white engineers but have sacked them as they only have a small quota for employing whites. See here. The trouble is, they did the same for teachers so now have very few teachers and none bright enough to train engineers. Eskom, the state company supplying electricity is falling down for a shortage of skilled workers. Whereas they can't employ white South Africans, if you work under contract, you might get work there, whether white or black. And name your price!

South Africa, other than the Western Cape, is quite a dangerous country. However, if we elect to remain in the European Union, you will find South Africa a lot safer than the new United Kingdom.

Ampers.


EU Referendum blog link

Just had a look at the EUEXITFACTS blog and there is some very interesting information. I suggest it's worth a visit.

Ampers

Wednesday, 6 April 2016

Great trailer for Brexit the Movie.

Looking forward to the premier, and the party afterwards, but invites only for those who have donated £250 for Brexit The Movie. Kickstarter has now closed, and the film is on May 11th.

If you can't get to see the movie, you can watch it on the Internet from day two. If you are coming to the premier at the Leicester Square Odeon, and have priority tickets, do say hello. Ditto at the party afterwards.


Ampers

London-wide Assembly Member candidates 2016


The most important party is listed first, and the rest are in alphabetical order.


UK Independence Party (UKIP)
    WHITTLE, Peter Robin
    KURTEN, David Michael
    WEBB, Lawrence James
    HARRIS, Peter James
    WATSON, Neville Kenneth
    WAUCHOPE, Piers
    AFZAL, Akram
    JONES, Elizabeth Eirwen
    SAEED, Tariq
    VACHHA, Freddy
    STAVELEY, Peter

Animal Welfare Party
    HUDSON, Vanessa Helen
    HOMAN, Jonathan David Burton
    BOURKE, Alexander Leslie
    SEDDON, Linda Irene
    CSONTOS, Zsanett

Britain First - Putting British people first

    FRANSEN, Jayda
    GOLDING, Paul
    ELSTONE, Jake
    SMITH, Christine Beryl
    ELSTONE, Anne
    SMITH, Nancy
    ROUSE, Hollie
    SAUNDERS, Peggy
    KING, Donna
    MCMULLEN, Kevan
    CONNOR, Steven

British National Party
    FURNESS, David
    STURDY, Paul Leslie William
    CLARKE, John James
    JONES, Michael
    FINCH, Peter
    FINCH, Nicola Anne
    UNDERWOOD, Denise
    DILLON, Stephen
    DALTON, Philip
    TONKS, Roger William
    JONES, Gareth William
    SMITH, Bede Ewing

Caroline Pidgeon's London Liberal Democrats
    PIDGEON, Caroline Valerie
    DAVEY, Emily Jane
    EMERSON, Merlene Soo Chin Toh
    BLACKIE, Robert
    POLANSKI, Zack
    BARNES, Dawn
    MULLIN, Annabel Jean Charlotte
    RAY, Marisha Priyanka
    HYYRYLAINEN-TRETT, Adrian James
    PEARCE, Pauline
    MATHIS, Benjamin

Christian Peoples Alliance
    MARTIN, Malcolm Kershaw
    MARTIN, Maureen Maud
    AWOLOLA, Yemi
    SPIBY-VANN, Helen
    TOWEY, Ray
    ADEWUYI, Damilola
    MILLS, Kathy
    SHEDONO, Kayode
    COKE, Des
    DICKENSON, Ashley Keith
    HAMMOND, Stephen
    NICHOLS, Kevin William

Conservative Party

    BADENOCH, Kemi
    BOFF, Andrew
    BAILEY, Shaun
    HALL, Susan Mary
    BHOGAL, Amandeep Singh
    LABAN, Joanne Louise
    COX, Antonia Mary
    MORRISSEY, Joy
    BARNES, Timothy
    STAFFORD, Gregory
    DEVANI, Kishan Rajesh
    COPE, Jonathan

Green Party - "vote Green on orange"
    BERRY, Sian Rebecca
    RUSSELL, Caroline
    ALI, Shahrar
    BARTLEY, Jonathan
    LYNCH, Noel Thomas
    NIX, Rashid
    SEARLE, Dee
    HAMDACHE, Benali
    CAREY FULLER, Andrea Elizabeth
    WARRINGTON, Anne
    UNDERWOOD, Peter

Labour Party
    TWYCROSS, Fiona Ruth
    COPLEY,  Tom Phillip
    GAVRON, Nicky
    QURESHI, Murad
    MOORE, Alison
    TABOIS, Preston
    DEMIRCI, Feryal
    KATZ, Mike
    BROTHERS, Emily
    POWELL, Bevan Anthony
    HYDE, Sara

Respect (George Galloway)
    GALLOWAY, George
    MAHMOOD, Akib Naheem
    MICKAIL, Rayne
    MCCAUGHEY, Clare
    ALI, Rehiana
    HOY, Terry
    ALLEN, Tim
    VIRGO, Simon James
    DUTT, Saurav
    MAHMOOD, Tehmeena
    LOCKHART, Karina

The House Party - Homes For Londoners
    MCGRENERA, Terry

Women's Equality Party

    WALKER, Sophie
    IYENGAR, Harini
    GUDERLEY, Jacquelyn Elaine
    PARASRAM, Isabelle Amanda
    HOWARD, Melanie
    SHAW, Joanna Elizabeth
    DHAMI, Anila
    MASSEY-CHASE, Katherine Leah
    MARSHALL, Alison Hilary
    PAOUROS, Christina Andria
    MANSON JONES, Rebecca Catherine

Tuesday, 5 April 2016

Some home truths about South Africa

Warning: 1hr 23 mins long

I've given you the above warning to give you a chance to bookmark it until you have the time to watch this extremely interesting video.

As most already know, the Bantu came into South Africa from the North, around the 15th/16th Century and killed off nearly all of the indigenous population (the Bushmen and the Hottentots) the survivors now live in or on the outskirts of the Kalahari desert. The whites then came in in the middle of the 17th Century.

This video covers the history from the mid 17th Century, the political scene from 1940 through to 2015, including education, crime and politics.

It is a very educational and fascinating video and I recommend it to whites and blacks in South Africa, providing you are not a communist, or a white liberal. Both of which will find it too uncomfortable to view.

It is by Stefan Molyneux of Freedomain Radio in the United States, Stefan has a reputation of being factually honest and is hated by Liberals throughout the West for drawing people to uncomfortable truths. He has lived in South Africa twice, once when six and longer in his late teens, where his father worked under contract there.


Ampers.

Monday, 4 April 2016

Multi-national empires never work in the long run.

Interesting piece by UKIP's Margot Parker MEP

Multi-national empires never work in the long run.

If you travel to Northern-Africa today, in the hot sands of Egypt for example, you can see the ruins of opulent buildings of the once mighty Roman Empire. The remnants of the Roman courts, palaces and gymnasia are dotted all over this continent and others.

People were once taught to believe that the Roman Empire would last forever, that it was invincible, indestructible - and most importantly inevitable; that here was no alternative but to be obedient and to submit to its political and military power. This was not true.

A study of history shows us that large multi-national empires, or political unions if you like, do not work. They do not function properly and furthermore, do not survive. Where today is the Roman Empire, the Ottoman Empire, or the Austro-Hungarian Empire? They are all finished, their once proud monuments covered over by the sands of time.

Spurred on by events, the peoples of these once powerful political unions, acted to seek one of the most precious things that a people can possess - their freedom and the ability to determine their own future.

Not to mention the Soviet Union which lasted a mere 70 years. And, when we leave the European Union, they will slowly collapse, unless we try to leave under the evil "article 50" plan, which will keep us in as full members, paying the whole amount, for two years and, if the other members in the EU vote to keep us in for another two years, we have to continue paying. This can go on every two years indefinitely. Gerard Batten MEP has a better plan, but Cameron won't even entertain anything from UKIP.

Ampers.

Friday, 1 April 2016

How to Place New Employees in an Organization:

  1. Put 400 bricks in a closed room.
  2. Put your new hires in the room and close the door.
  3. Leave them alone and come back after 6 hours.
  4. Then analyse the situation:
  •     If they are counting the bricks, put them in the accounting.
  •     If they are recounting them, put them in auditing.
  •     If they have messed up the whole place with the bricks put them in           engineering.
  •     If they are arranging the bricks in some strange order, put them in planning.
  •     If they are throwing the bricks at each other, put them in operations.
  •     If they are sleeping, put them in security.
  •     If they have broken the bricks into pieces, put them in information technology.
  •     If they are sitting idle, put them in human resources.
  •     If they say they have tried different combinations, they are looking for more, yet not a brick has been moved, put them in sales.
  •     If they have already left for the day, put them in marketing.
  •     If they are staring out of the window, put them in strategic planning.
  •     If they are talking to each other, and not a single brick has been moved, congratulate them and put them in top management.
Finally, if they have surrounded themselves with bricks in such a way that they can neither be seen nor heard from, put them in parliament.

Thursday, 31 March 2016

Africans for Britain: Why do I back Brexit?


 Ms Youma is a bilingual Pan-Africanist & Anglophile, she believes no one else but Africans will power up her renaissance. Free trade fanatic.

Follow her on Twitter: @youmajamilaNAN

This has also been posted on Conservative Home. I have had permission from Youma to publish this on my blog.

First of all, I am neither British nor from a Commonwealth Nation. In fact, I was born in France and should Britain exit the EU, my countries of origin in Africa: Burkina-Faso and the Ivory coast are unlikely to benefit directly or immediately.

Some argue my Euroscepticism is misguided, since I benefited from free movement of people within the EU, in order to move to Britain. I am also a Pan-Africanist, and believe that in the next century, the African continent will inevitably merge into the political Union which I think is pernicious for Britain, and also for the rest of Europe.

I wasn’t always a Eurosceptic. I was educated within the French curriculum, which is extremely enthusiastic about the EU, or still was in the 90s when I was in High school, and the early 2000s when I was living in France. I remember withdrawing my first Euro notes. I felt European, as I was not yet aware of what the European Union really embodied. I saw it as this beacon of European peace, an economic bloc which had guaranteed the European economic miracle of the after war, the way to go.

Yet, if today, I am a Eurosceptic, it is for Britain, the land which welcomed and transformed me in the past 10 years. It is also for my continent of origin Africa, whose relationship with Britain, once free from the EU, I see as being rekindled, and whose treatment by the EU I find appalling.

I am also a Eurosceptic for France, strange as it may read. France’s elites have an almost unconditional commitment to the EU across the political spectrum, and despite a recent poll published in Le Monde suggesting the French would also welcome a Frexit, I still believe that France is overwhelmingly committed to the European project.

It therefore needs dissidents from its own mould to campaign for Brexit.  The youth of France needs to be inspired to challenge the status quo within the EU, even if France stays a member going forward.

I see Britain as one of the greatest Nations on Earth, having a little bias towards the Ivory Coast and Burkina-Faso. I believe this nation’s ability to embrace different cultures and to make them feel welcome to the point of creating a sense of citizenry and loyalty is unparalleled in an increasing culturally challenged Western world. Once free of a political project to which she does not subscribe, she will rediscover her global trading soul. She will proceed to formally sign mutually beneficial trade deals with her Commonwealth bloc as well as the EU, and I believe that Britain will aim larger.

She once had the largest empire in the world, she will once again go into the world, but with an agenda aimed at cooperating and trading with the seldom heard nations, whose voices are quashed by the kind of super structures which dominate the EU. This situation threatens social cohesion equally in Britain, Uganda or France in an interconnected World.

By trading her way with the World which is growing, she will look after future generations and make sure they are not burdened with unnecessary debts, the kind currently amassed especially in the beleaguered economies of the eurozone. It will be a truly powerful leap of faith, the kinds which this nation throughout her history has shown herself to be capable of.

This is how Britain stayed ahead of the curve, especially when it came to facing the less glorious parts of her history such as slavery and colonialism. Any wonder that the three nations predicted to lead the Word in the 21st century are all former British colonies? That the fastest growing conomies in Africa or its best governed nations, are former British colonies?

This is the critical look which the Pan-Africanist in me takes at British history and its legacy in my land of origin. It does not absolve Britain of the darker moments of its history.  I believe there comes a point when this nation will have to acknowledge publicly its responsibility as part of a global system, which stripped away Afro descendants of the soul which in the 21st century they are trying to piece together.

Yet, the legacy of Britain in Africa is also a culture in the African Anglosphere, which many of us in the Francophone block envy. We wish we had greater entrepreneurial instincts, less red tape, a culture less based on state dependency, and the strong institutions and civil societies which the African Anglosphere exhibits. This is the positive legacy of the passage of Britain in Africa, as a coloniser. Brexit is about the future, and over half of the Commonwealth Nations are either in Africa or the Caribbean. Those nations are bound by a common struggle: self-determination. The EU, through her protectionist practices such as the Common Agricultural Policy, the Common Fisheries Policy and her so called “free” trade deals imposed on Nations with little bargaining power, stands in the way of this self-determination.

I have read a number of reports on the policies pursued by the EU in Africa and their economic impact, and far from me the idea of rubbishing completely the relationship between the EU and Africa, as having been a complete disaster.

It was an article about the impact of the Common Fisheries Policy which made me click, and like it always is with politics, it became personal. I was reading about the plight of communities in Senegal depending on fishing for their livelihoods, and who faced with the unfair competition from the big European vessels had to stop trading. I will not go into the details of the environmental damage caused by this over fishing, but I now had a big clue to a question whose answer I had looked for in recent months.

Why do so many Senegalese young men need to migrate? Senegal is a country I love. In the past couple of years, I have paid the school fees of a young Senegalese boy met during a trip 6 years ago. I hoped to help him be able to support his family thanks to his education. A Senegalese young man whom I introduced to the Tony Elumelu Entrepreneurship Program put together a business plan which made him abandon his project to come to Europe as an economic migrant. I have got friends and family in Senegal, who have to support their less fortunate family members, and whilst I am sure that what pushes young Senegalese men to leave their country in search of a better life in Europe cannot be only blamed on the Common Fisheries Policy, its contribution to the devastation of entire coastal communities is morally reprehensible.

The resulting pull towards migration, the brain drain away from Africa is a tragedy for this continent whose wealth will help other regions of the world in the future. That is my plea as an African to British citizens of African and Caribbean descent to consider what the EU has done to their lands of origin.

Now, I am sitting at a brasserie watching the French news reporting, day in day out. What do I see? One company closing down after another, potential redundancies, cosmetic reforms of the Welfare state pompously announced by the Socialist administration, which has been unable to deliver the program it was elected on.

I see the crisis with France’s feisty farmers, I read about employees of a council locking down their Mayor and threatening him. I see Smart, the car company asking some of its employees to accept to work for 40 hours paid 35 for the next 5 years in order to not lose their jobs. I look at the deepening migration crisis and its ramifications for social cohesion in France, this country and its Republic and her contradictions, when it comes to embracing diversity.

I think about the African diaspora, the biggest one outside Africa living in France, usually in low paid employment, or small business owners, struggling to break even, even though on balance in 2016, there are improvements to the fortunes of French citizens of African descent compared to when I left in 2005.

I think about the country in which I was born, in which I used to spend my summer holidays, in which I first got married and divorced, in which I still have my best friends and members of my family.

I look for its Eurosceptics, and I cannot ever see them working together. I therefore believe that once Britain is free from the EU, she will inspire the youth of France to be more audacious, and more challenging of the European project. All those reasons are why, in a nutshell, I am a Eurosceptic even if I have no vote on the 23rd of June and might not live permanently in Britain afterwards. This is why I founded Africans for Britain.

Immigration, World Poverty and Gumballs/Maltesers

An incredibly interesting lecture on the futility of helping people through immigration.


Ampers